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Operational Reliability: Case Study of an RCM Analysis and the Unexpected Result

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Original date: 
Friday, May 12, 2017
Abstract: 
In this case study, presented at MainTrain 2017, highlights of an RCM analysis are reviewed including the unexpected outcome. The paper presents a powerful equation derived to calculate the number of inspections required to be performed within the interval between potential and functional failure. Sensitivity analyses are also performed to demonstrate how changes in certain data points affect the results of the analysis. The case study also demonstrates how the recommendation of the analysis was counter-intuitive to conventional thinking given a unique situation and highlights the importance of operational context. Developing an optimal maintenance strategy often requires a systematic approach that includes a Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) analysis. To be successful, these analyses require involvement from many stakeholders and performing a number of pro-active actions to detect or prevent functional failure. Such actions can be unpopular at times and require a solid partnership between the reliability engineering function and Operations and Maintenance.In this case study, highlights of an RCM analysis are reviewed including the unexpected outcome. When there are no safety or environmental consequences, the decision of whether to do an inspection is based on a cost-benefit analysis. This presentation discusses a case study recently performed during a reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) analysis at Cameco’s Port Hope Conversion Facility. The RCM analysis evaluated the cost effectiveness of partially removing a calciner shell to perform a non-destructive examination (NDE) of the bottom of the shell. The RCM uses a specific equation derived to calculate the number of inspections required to be performed within the interval between potential and functional failure. The equation is generic and can be used for any situation.One purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the identification of the interval between potential and functional failure and how the equation is used so the audience can replicate the analysis in their own situation. Sensitivity analyses are also performed to demonstrate how changes in certain data points affect the results of the analysis. The second purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate how the recommendation of the analysis was counter-intuitive to conventional thinking given a unique situation and highlights the importance of operational context.  
BoK Content Source: 
MainTrain 2017
BoK Content Type: 
Presentation Slides
Presentation Paper
Asset Management Framework Subject: 
3.00 Lifecycle Delivery General, 3.06 Reliability Engineering
Maintenance Management Framework Subject: 
02 Maintenance Program Mgmt, 2.1 Maintenance Requirements, 03 Asset Strategy Management, 3.1 Asset Maintenance Plans, 04 Tools and Tactics, 4.1 Reliability Centered Maint., 4.6 Condition Monitoring, 05 Maintenance & Reliability Engineering, 5.0 Maintenance and Reliability Eng General, 5.1 Stats Analysis / Analytical Methods
Author Title: 
Director, Physical Asset Management & Reliability
Author Employer: 
Cameco Corporation
Author Bio: 

Jean-Pierre (J.P.) Pascoli, P.Eng, CMRP, CAMA

J.-P. is the director, physical asset management & reliability for Cameco Corporation, an uranium mining and nuclear fuel manufacturer based in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Prior to this he was manager, engineering & maintenance at Cameco’s conversion facility in Port Hope, Ontario. 

Before joining Cameco, J.-P. held a number of management positions, including manager, maintenance & reliability for an OSB producer in northern Ontario, and superintendent, maintenance services for a pulp and paper manufacturer based in eastern Quebec. Leading to these positions were a number of technical appointments with a nickel mining company at various sites in northern Ontario and Quebec, including senior projects engineer, and senior maintenance engineer. 

J.-P. holds a degree in mechanical engineering from the Faculty of Applied Science at Queen’s University and is a graduate of the University of Toronto’s Physical Asset Management Program.  He is a licensed engineer with Professional Engineers Ontario and Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec, as well as a certified maintenance and reliability professional with SMRP and a certified asset management assessor (CAMA).  He is an active board member of PEMAC currently serving as vice-president.


 

Author 2 Title: 
President
Author 2 Employer: 
Core Principles, LLC
Author 2 Bio: 
Rich Overman, CMRP, CRL has over 30 years of experience in working with companies and facilities to improve their organization as well as their equipment maintenance and reliability. He is the author of the internationally known book “Reliability Centered Asset Management”. His experience covers many industries including higher education, jet aircraft, nuclear power plants, mining, petro-chemical, pharmaceutical and nuclear fuel conversion. He is an expert in process design, FMECA, RCM, life cycle cost analysis, and other aspects of equipment maintenance and reliability. An internationally known speaker, trainer and author, Rich has spoken at numerous conferences and was invited to be an eminent speaker for the Maintenance Engineering Society of Australia (MESA). His paper at the MESA annual conference, “The Core Principles of Reliability-Centered Maintenance” was published in the Asset Maintenance Management Journal (V22. N1). He has taught courses on Maintenance and Reliability Best Practices and Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) in the USA, Canada, Malaysia, Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Australia. He also authored the book, “Versatile Reliability-Centered Maintenance” and was on the team that wrote the original Society for Automotive Engineers RCM standards, JA1011 and JA1012. Rich has a Bachelors degree in Mechanical Engineering, a Master of Science degree in Science Education and a Master of Divinity. He also has a Graduate Certificate in Maintenance and Reliability Engineering.